Radio 1 on 1: Interview with Frequency Magazine

Frequency Magazine

“Radio 1 on 1: 25 of the Most Asked Questions in Radio Broadcasting” has been well received by the campus, community, online and retail markets.  PART 1 covers an in depth arrival on finding your voice and place in the broadcasting industry, and stations like Tuks FM, Alex FM, Moutse FM, UJ FM and more have welcomed the knowledge of upskilling their movement in their media careers.

I was fortunate enough to be interviewed recently by Frequency Magazine, who showcase and celebrate local talent and the thriving of the South African media market.

Chatting to editor Chabbie Matsapola, we conversed over getting into the industry, finding your “40 year plan”, the current talent regime, and what being in the industry is all about.

Frequency Interview Part I

Frequency Interview Part II

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Radio 1 on 1 Preview: Constructive Criticism of Your Programming Performance

Pay attention when you are being trained in broadcasting, because that training comes few and far between.  This makes the industry sound cold, but your programme manager will only have regular snoop sessions that have to do with feedback on your show.  The rest of it is up to you.

Evaluate your performance after every show.  Firstly, ask yourself whether you had any “magic moments”.  Magic Moments are times in the show that shone brighter than your regular great performances.  And they should be celebrated.  It’s important to hone in your accomplishments on air by seeing what you did and what was the essence of what it was that created a magic moment.  Magic moments are not supposed to happen in every hour of your show, and even to a large extent, not every day on your show.  Those that will culminate from producing, preparing and performing good radio.  And that is your aim for every hour of every show.  To make good radio.

Do the same crit for elements of your show that were mediocre or perhaps dismal.  See them as growth experiences that need to be corrected immediately.  Again, it is important for you to ask yourself why these elements of your show were anything but good, or great.  Focus on repairing this before trying anything gutsy.  People will hold it against you if you have done a bad show, and if you’re lucky, you will be able to redeem this either during that show or in the next that you host with better preparation.

Why is “mediocre”, the worst feedback you can get, or give yourself while criticising your show performance?

Because it is not memorable.  If the opinion of your show by a listener is that you are “mediocre”, meaning they don’t care whether you’re on or not, it is the same as experiencing career suicide.  So, dare to be great.

Listen to weekly updates of my new audiobook in radio broadcasting here, and don’t forget subscribe

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Radio 1 on 1 : 25 of the Most Asked Questions in Radio Broadcasting

Radio 1 on 1 audio series by Chris Jordan, Part 1 available for free at this link

Welcome to the official page of my audiobook “Radio 1 on 1 : 25 of the Most Asked Questions in Radio Broadcasting”

This marks another milestone in my passion for both radio broadcasting, and for educating the next generation of broadcasters.

Here, in PART 1, we will explore the beginning of your journey in this industry, and your career as a media practitioner.

My aim, and hope, is to interact with as many aspiring, and seasonal broadcasters out there.  You are invited to comment and interact with any questions and comments on this page, and look forward to some monthly Masterclasses right here.

Bookmark this page, and subscribe to download the full 13 episodes of PART 1 for FREE.

Let’s start your journey together.  DARE TO BE GREAT.

Introduction


What is Radio?


How do we define personality?


A Word on Control


The Gen-Necessary of Radio


How to look for the right content


What role does my voice play?


What can I expect from my first time on air?


What is my role as a broadcaster?


What does it mean to have a career in Radio?


How do I break into this industry?


Is Radio for you?


What should be on a demo?


PART 2 coming soon.


Edited by Jason Rademeyer

Contact No: 072 724 3308

Email: jasonrademeyer8@gmail.com

Top 5 Most Bankable Radio Broadcasters for 2017

5. Roger Goode

Roger makes the cut this year as he had a tough time keeping it together. In what was an imploding industry, where radio in South Africa took many blows – Roger had a stigma to fight as he took over the coveted role of breakfast host on youth station 5FM. “Would he survive?” – is what people would ask. Well, yes. He did. With morning radio that is quirky and enjoyable – Roger needs to be taken more seriously. Underestimated for too long, Goode has great synergy with his team, and makes mornings great.

4. Anele Mdoda

Anele remains a powerhouse. Though this year saw a tough start for her as she took over the breakfast show on 947, Anele remains relevant with her daily show and presence across social media platforms. The only reason why Anele is not at number one is because of the fluctuating change in listenership on 947, where taking over a massive show is bound to drop in numbers until the stabilisation happens (which will happen around June next year). Nevertheless, Anele forges forward without much need from her team to make her a brand worth reckoning. The show has both light and shade, and is finding its feet slowly and surely.

3. Mo Flava

Born 2 July 1984 in Dube Soweto, Mo Flava embarked on a media studies diploma at Boston Media House, majoring in radio broadcasting and programming, as well as journalism. He also has a Diploma in Media Studies. Having hosted radio shows on both YFM and Metro FM, Mo Flava has endeared himself to thousands of listeners across the country and shared several countless emotional moments with them. The great thing about Mo is that he did the unthinkable. He managed to retain an exodus of listeners from YFM to Metro FM when he first made his move. Listeners hardly ever make a move for a broadcaster, as formats rarely offer the same product, no matter how good you are as a broadcaster. His popularity exceeded expectation, and Mo keeps shining as one of the biggest radio stars in the country.

2. David O’Sullivan

Talk is often overshadowed by the media frenzy and popular trends created by music radio. And having David as a talk brand for so long, made for a sense of a new kind of normal to place him in Kaya’s breakfast role this year when Bob Mabena left. David has a strong sense of self and an even stronger sense of listener-self. He connects with you in a way that transcends a need for music or talk radio, and fills a need for being informed and entertained. Kaya made a bold and smart choice putting David where he is.

1. DJ Fresh

The “big dawg” has resurrected himself in 2017. Going from 5FM’s breakfast to Metro FM’s breakfast, Fresh has fallen into a coincidental luck pocket of listenership that has his YFM listeners from 10 years already navigated to Metro FM waiting for his arrival. Being at its most stable through the radio landscape in 2017, Metro has both Fresh and its listeners to thank for its continued rise and strength. Fresh’s show is by far the best breakfast radio you will currently hear in SA, finding his perfect match in where he is right now in his career, and where the industry wants (and needs) him.

A career in radio: Is it just another job?

dream-job-radio

dream-job-radio

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – and this is the final post in the series. See the blog section of the website for the other posts and for insights into similar questions to the one below.

So, Is it just another job?

Yes. And no. Yes. It is a job, but more so, like all jobs, you need to see it as a career.

The moment you don’t have your eye on a 40 year long prize, this is going to be a very difficult path for you to take. It already is difficult enough working in a craft based industry, where your skills are very specific and cannot cross pollinate you to other sectors with as much ease as someone in finance can.

So, don’t make it harder than it needs to be. Here, in South Africa, our radio industry is small, which means that working at a radio station is a coveted position. And there is a very, very long queue of others waiting outside the front doors just waiting to get in. I am not selling you paranoia, just reality. Where what the field of Information Technology does for a growing work force is what radio cannot do realistically for all those hopefuls popping up ‘off the street’ or graduating from varsity.

So, no, it isn’t just like any other job. It is specific. And niche. And beautiful. And wonderful. And so, is quite special. Make the 40-year plan, and aim to become a connoisseur of the medium. A professional that contributes to the industry, instead of just taking up space. As someone else could, and will fill that space up just as easily.

Gain further insights into the radio field

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

Until then, I”ll catch you for the next post series, and have a wonderful festive season.

– Chris

How do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – this being the third in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, how do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

The term “exposure” is relative. If your aim is to be ‘famous’, then you are doing this for the wrong reasons completely.

You are a public servant of sorts. A conduit between the world and your listener. Becoming well-known is an obvious side-effect of being on a public forum, but that, again, should not be your focus or main concern. In another context, “exposure” in the industry is self-made. We have already moved into an era where you must have presence. You must be actively engaging with an obligation to creating content and voicing yours and other’s view and opinions on the world around you.

Through the power of social media, you have no excuse but to make yourself available, and connected. With the power in knowledge of base technology, you have no excuse but to be creating podcasts that are clean and easily edited from a simple void recording. If you can take a selfie, or a record yourself with mates on Facebook live – you should be able to create stories on Instagram by snapping with a creative purpose, and go live with a short video broadcast of you at an event on Facebook live, alternatively posting on YouTube and getting those views onwards and upwards.

Creative directors and industry elite are masters of the world around them. If you want exposure, expose yourself. So that others can see you, and what it is that you can do. Don’t sell yourself short. If people are YouTube-ing squirrels that dance, they can and will watch something cool and interesting you should give them.

Learn more

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be looking at overcoming your fears, if you consider yourself to be someone without a radio voice.

Until then, lets make Tuesday a special one!

– Chris

How do I get my career in radio started?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

I firstly want to take a moment to say thank you for putting your trust in my knowledge and I am happy to take this journey with you.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions will be featured in a five post series – this being the first in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog over the next few weeks to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, how do I get my career in radio started?

Before you get started, you should decide what it is that you want to do. I say this because Programme Managers don’t like prospective employees coming in for interviews that don’t have a clear idea about what it is that they can offer the industry.

Identifying your strengths are in line with identifying your passion. If you are passionate about something you are more likely to offer a PM a stronger product or service. How do you figure this out? Well. Let me firstly state that I understand it is difficult to know what you want to do, when you not quite sure yet whether you have the correct point of reference. So, here’s the kicker, start talking to people in the industry.

Visit radio stations in your area to get a better idea as to what it is they do there. Research literature around broadcasting. Perhaps take up a short course in radio to find your learned perspective about what it is that you want to do. Radio has grown and grown in terms of the career opportunities that exist within this field.

Educate yourself. Find out more. Do your thing.

Find out more

To learn more, have a look at my book, A Word on Radio, available here or via Amazon Kindle. Also feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be tackling the often dreaded question, But is it too late to start a career in radio?

Until then, look after yourself and others.

– Chris

 

 

For the love of radio

For the love of radio

Welcome back to a new facelift to my blogging, now bannered under “Chris Jordan Media”.  It’s all very exciting.  Independently rising amongst your own ranks is something to behold.

Let me explain if you are new to the site.  For quite some time now, in fact just over 3 years now, I left the commercial space in radio.  A bit of a lost soul, and having been in this situation before (a jock without a home) way back in 2007, I knew better this time.  You see, flashback to the first time I was a wandering broadcaster, to tell you the truth, I swore off doing radio, and tried to go back into what I had academically prepared myself for – which was Information Technology and Software Development.  While I was studying my BSc, I “fell” into radio in my third year at Tuks FM, and was, like most will tell you, bitten by a radio bug you can’t quite understand until you have that fever for wanting to put it beyond and before anything else you want to do in life.

Back to me wanting to quit the mic.  Well, it didn’t last long. Despite all efforts.  I had very good friends who believed in the work I had put out for just over 6 years at that point. They tracked me down, and although I responded literally kicking and screaming, convinced me to join a new and ground breaking mobile venture in radio they were starting.  I must add, that they were the only ones that did believe in my talent (myself excluded).  And that’s all I needed.  A love for radio.  A love for the radio I made.  A love for the radio I wanted to make.

Fast forward to a sense of self-confidence in what it is that one can offer the industry in ways only you can discover, not in ways a manager or a slot in a line up could define.  Where was my love for radio?

As much as I know I am a great broadcaster, a well-rounded professional that knows and can apply myself to various roles in the industry, this is what was important as I navigated through my next (and the next, and next after that) chapter in my career.

Career. That was a word I never understood until I did leave commercial radio just 3 years back. It’s a decision that after a decade of being in the industry – could only process as something I DID indeed want to do, for the rest of my life.  A self-sustaining, service driven, satisfying professional contribution to the industry I loved so much.  So that’s what I did.

I realised my biggest strength ran a thread around training and development. In teaching. In aiding. In building. In expanding and attracting knowledge to this industry.  And I wanted, and did, make peace with that.  I wrote books, taught seminars, lectured classes, started consulting and trained professionals of all walks of life in all platforms within media.  And I loved it.  Correction. I love it.

For the love of radio.  Here I am. With a media company of my own, that I have plans for. As I do for myself, and the industry I love.

— Chris

Why ‘A Word on Radio’ is a must-read for aspiring radio broadcasters across the continent

Why ‘A Word on Radio’ is a must-read for aspiring radio broadcasters across the continent

Radio industry specialist Chris Jordan answers a few questions about his groundbreaking book ‘A Word on Radio’ , as well as touching on his extensive career in broadcasting and detailing his learnings over the last few decades in order to help the next generation of broadcasters across the African continent.

Why did you decide to write ‘A Word on Radio’?

By the time I had begun writing the book, I had been fortunate enough to work in the radio industry starting in the ranks as a campus/community presenter, all the way through to international work, and had around 10 years of broadcasting experience under my belt. I had also been a radio lecturer for about 3 years at that stage and felt it was time to test myself in a what I felt I knew about the industry. I had been teaching young broadcasters out of suggested material provided by the campus and was given free reign on how to and what to teach the students wanting to make a career choice in broadcasting. As I started to work on more and more case studies, I began to formalise a professional approach to our craft as broadcasters, and felt the book would be the best way to legitimise this notion. It was a pleasant discomfort to realize I would even learn a lot in the process considering there is so much existing literature on the subject out there, but I decided to focus more on the academic nature of broadcasting in conjunction with the practical application within the industry, and thus ‘A Word on Radio’ was born.

Who is the ideal reader for the book?

While it is an academic book on the programming nature of radio, I feel like a broad range of people could benefit from the content of the book.  Whether you are someone who has no prior radio experience, someone studying specifically in radio or a similar field, a relatively novice broadcaster broadcaster or someone in commercial radio with a thirst for more knowledge – this book is for you.

What is the one thing you hope people will take from reading the book?

How to be a better broadcaster.  There are many areas of interest in radio, but this book focuses on how to be a better one and help grow the radio industry in South Africa. I have not only covered a wide range of areas, from how to put your shows together, to how to write for news and even how to build your on air personality; I have also focused tried and tested tertiary institutions methodologies and models that assist in really refining the approach of broadcasting to the fine craft it is.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in the radio industry?

The short answer is that I don’t know! (laughs). I studied a BSC in IT and a BComm in Knowledge Systems at Varsity and nothing in particular pointed me in this direction. That was until applications to join for Tuks FM (Pretoria’s campus radio station) opened up to the public. I went for it with everything I had to give at that stage and subsequently truly fell in love with the medium. It was something I did on a volunteer basis at first, but with no complaints as the experience I gained there was invaluable to my career. There was no carrot dangling at the end of a stick and it came from a pure place of passion.16 years later, I’ve made a life and career out of radio and also made a decision to actively be someone who propels the industry forward as a professional and not just a contributor.

How hard is it to get a foot in the door in the radio industry?

It depends on what door, what foot you’re using and how hard you are pushing. All are factors that will play a role in the progression of your radio career. Even if you get a lucky break and an ‘in’ to the industry via campus radio in your early twenties, it is incredibly difficult to stay in the industry, and takes hard work to remain relevant and ahead of the talented pack in the South African industry. You have to have a hunger to succeed and the drive to put in the work it takes to advance your career.

What advice do you have for someone who wants to become a radio presenter, news reader or content producer?

Be honest with yourself in confronting your talent and potential to work in these areas. Not everyone can be a doctor, architect, performance artist, or musician. Similarly, not everyone can be a broadcaster. Know what you’re proficient in, have a passion for and pursue these areas with everything you’ve got.

What else are you busy with at the moment career-wise?

I have started Chris Jordan Media, which has been a very exciting experience for me and a natural next step in my career. ‘A Word on Radio’ and any future publications will fall under this company. I’ve also been providing consulting, training and development services to online and community stations in the South Africa. I collaborate with broadcasters from both television and radio with their development in a private capacity and this is a very rewarding experience for me personally.  As a next step and looking towards the latter half of 2017, CJM will release an eight week online broadcasting course in collaboration with some great professionals in the industry (who I can’t talk about just yet). Lastly, I’ve been invited to be a panelist at various radio conferences this year and am also assisting with RadioDays Africa 2017, so lots going on and lots to look forward to!

What do you make of the SABC decision from last year to broadcast 90% local music and how has it impacted the quality of radio?

The idea of promoting local talent is a first for anyone who is passionate about the arts in South Africa. I appreciate the sentiment, but stations work on formats that are methodically structured around  growing listenership year-on-year. In my opinion, the formats have suffered as a result of a ripple effect of not having enough (and by enough, I mean “90%” of a formats music policy) well produced and marketed locally bred and funded talent. South Africa’s music industry has an abundance of talent, but not enough of that talent is commercially consumable to make the 90% directive appealing across a days worth of radio programming.

What did you learn about yourself in the process of writing the book?

I learnt that I had a choice in making radio a career, not just a flight of fancy. To claim authority on subject matter, is to commit to a life’s work in it and all these years later I’m proud of myself for sticking to my guns and pursuing my passion with everything I have.

Do you plan on publishing another book in the future?

Yes! I am currently working on a book that will be a first for teaching radio in South Africa, a course for secondary schooling students that will academically aligned to the correct NQF levels in education, as well as a first year textbook for tertiary institutions.’A Word on Radio’ is currently being used in media campuses around South Africa at a second year level and has sold around 1600 copies, also having been renewed until 2018.

To purchase a physical or eBook copy of ‘A Word on Radio’, please check out this page or visit Amazon.com.