Top 5 Most Bankable Radio Broadcasters for 2017

5. Roger Goode

Roger makes the cut this year as he had a tough time keeping it together. In what was an imploding industry, where radio in South Africa took many blows – Roger had a stigma to fight as he took over the coveted role of breakfast host on youth station 5FM. “Would he survive?” – is what people would ask. Well, yes. He did. With morning radio that is quirky and enjoyable – Roger needs to be taken more seriously. Underestimated for too long, Goode has great synergy with his team, and makes mornings great.

4. Anele Mdoda

Anele remains a powerhouse. Though this year saw a tough start for her as she took over the breakfast show on 947, Anele remains relevant with her daily show and presence across social media platforms. The only reason why Anele is not at number one is because of the fluctuating change in listenership on 947, where taking over a massive show is bound to drop in numbers until the stabilisation happens (which will happen around June next year). Nevertheless, Anele forges forward without much need from her team to make her a brand worth reckoning. The show has both light and shade, and is finding its feet slowly and surely.

3. Mo Flava

Born 2 July 1984 in Dube Soweto, Mo Flava embarked on a media studies diploma at Boston Media House, majoring in radio broadcasting and programming, as well as journalism. He also has a Diploma in Media Studies. Having hosted radio shows on both YFM and Metro FM, Mo Flava has endeared himself to thousands of listeners across the country and shared several countless emotional moments with them. The great thing about Mo is that he did the unthinkable. He managed to retain an exodus of listeners from YFM to Metro FM when he first made his move. Listeners hardly ever make a move for a broadcaster, as formats rarely offer the same product, no matter how good you are as a broadcaster. His popularity exceeded expectation, and Mo keeps shining as one of the biggest radio stars in the country.

2. David O’Sullivan

Talk is often overshadowed by the media frenzy and popular trends created by music radio. And having David as a talk brand for so long, made for a sense of a new kind of normal to place him in Kaya’s breakfast role this year when Bob Mabena left. David has a strong sense of self and an even stronger sense of listener-self. He connects with you in a way that transcends a need for music or talk radio, and fills a need for being informed and entertained. Kaya made a bold and smart choice putting David where he is.

1. DJ Fresh

The “big dawg” has resurrected himself in 2017. Going from 5FM’s breakfast to Metro FM’s breakfast, Fresh has fallen into a coincidental luck pocket of listenership that has his YFM listeners from 10 years already navigated to Metro FM waiting for his arrival. Being at its most stable through the radio landscape in 2017, Metro has both Fresh and its listeners to thank for its continued rise and strength. Fresh’s show is by far the best breakfast radio you will currently hear in SA, finding his perfect match in where he is right now in his career, and where the industry wants (and needs) him.

A career in radio: Is it just another job?

dream-job-radio

dream-job-radio

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – and this is the final post in the series. See the blog section of the website for the other posts and for insights into similar questions to the one below.

So, Is it just another job?

Yes. And no. Yes. It is a job, but more so, like all jobs, you need to see it as a career.

The moment you don’t have your eye on a 40 year long prize, this is going to be a very difficult path for you to take. It already is difficult enough working in a craft based industry, where your skills are very specific and cannot cross pollinate you to other sectors with as much ease as someone in finance can.

So, don’t make it harder than it needs to be. Here, in South Africa, our radio industry is small, which means that working at a radio station is a coveted position. And there is a very, very long queue of others waiting outside the front doors just waiting to get in. I am not selling you paranoia, just reality. Where what the field of Information Technology does for a growing work force is what radio cannot do realistically for all those hopefuls popping up ‘off the street’ or graduating from varsity.

So, no, it isn’t just like any other job. It is specific. And niche. And beautiful. And wonderful. And so, is quite special. Make the 40-year plan, and aim to become a connoisseur of the medium. A professional that contributes to the industry, instead of just taking up space. As someone else could, and will fill that space up just as easily.

Gain further insights into the radio field

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

Until then, I”ll catch you for the next post series, and have a wonderful festive season.

– Chris

I don’t have a voice for radio, so what can I do?

voice-for-radio

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – this being the second last in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog to see the others and gain some useful tips regarding starting a career in the broadcasting industry in 2018.

I don’t have a voice for radio, so what can I do?

Having a personality is what the ‘radio voice’ is all about these days.

When I started seeing the shift from the traditional radio voice to more personality-based radio, I saw what was a strong focus on the teaching of what personality shift you can make to make your voice better heard. It is part of your skill set to be able to speak clearly, enunciate and pronounce words, thoughts and dialogue with authority and professionalism – so don’t think that having a great personality discounts you from doing what is expected of you. But it is important.

I was mentored by one of our industry’s greats in voice coaching who told me that it was never my voice that was going to be the problem, but the way I controlled it through the confidence and commitment to my ‘radio hat’ that I would put on every day.

This meant finding the right part of my authentically ‘me’ personality that represented a radio professional within myself. It was great advice, and I happily pay it forward to others out there reading this.

Want to know more?

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our final post of the series, I will be discussing a question that pops up with all people hoping to enter into the industry. Check back to the blog early next week to learn more.

Until then, have a wonderful rest of the week.

– Chris

How do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – this being the third in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, how do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

The term “exposure” is relative. If your aim is to be ‘famous’, then you are doing this for the wrong reasons completely.

You are a public servant of sorts. A conduit between the world and your listener. Becoming well-known is an obvious side-effect of being on a public forum, but that, again, should not be your focus or main concern. In another context, “exposure” in the industry is self-made. We have already moved into an era where you must have presence. You must be actively engaging with an obligation to creating content and voicing yours and other’s view and opinions on the world around you.

Through the power of social media, you have no excuse but to make yourself available, and connected. With the power in knowledge of base technology, you have no excuse but to be creating podcasts that are clean and easily edited from a simple void recording. If you can take a selfie, or a record yourself with mates on Facebook live – you should be able to create stories on Instagram by snapping with a creative purpose, and go live with a short video broadcast of you at an event on Facebook live, alternatively posting on YouTube and getting those views onwards and upwards.

Creative directors and industry elite are masters of the world around them. If you want exposure, expose yourself. So that others can see you, and what it is that you can do. Don’t sell yourself short. If people are YouTube-ing squirrels that dance, they can and will watch something cool and interesting you should give them.

Learn more

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be looking at overcoming your fears, if you consider yourself to be someone without a radio voice.

Until then, lets make Tuesday a special one!

– Chris