NCRW Snap Blog Day 2: Learnings from National Community Radio Week

We are in full momentum at National Community Radio Week, and the Marketing Managers are showing off the skills. Acting out a promotional mechanic is about the best way to identify pitfalls both on and off air. From charity to scandal and gossip, promotions butter your bread on both sides. Here are some pointers from today.

1. For a promotion to work you have to get into your listener’s head. Engage them emotively and your win is guaranteed. Why do you need to upskill yourself with a short course at Boston City Campus? Are you craving KFC at half the price? Is what you need this weekend a fantastical shopping experience at the new mall in Alex? As yourself questions that have a “yes” response alone, and pitch for that.

2. Listener’s must win. No great radio has ever created “losing” on air moments. Make your competitions easy and broad, so that passive listeners can turn to active listeners, and creating great winning on air moments.

3. Listen to your client. Ask questions that engage their lives, their product, their service – immediately. A client likes to talk about themselves (like every one else does). They DON’T like listening to you and how great your station is. If they want to know, they will ask.

4. When writing copy – Google it. Products and services will elude you. If you haven’t already sourced what you need from your client, Google it anyway. The more insight you get, the better.

5. Clear your mind. Old practices that haven’t worked, won’t work again. So get a fresh start on approaching your advertising. Re-evaluate the station’s position, it’s goals and objectives, and where it is that you want the station to go. Bring this ethos into how you deal with clients, meet a listener’s needs, and motivate your way forward.

That’s all for today.

Chris

NCRW Snap Blog Day 1: Marketing Your Radio Station

Sigh. That is one of relief. Day 1 behind us and all is well. Sitting in front of an odd 50 Radio Marketing Managers today we covered a lot of bases.

So what does it take to market your radio station?

Well, we are addressing community stations so I will limit my comments to the context at hand.

  1. A programmatic approach to what is needed to market is key for any media marketing practitioner to do their job properly. So have an ear for radio. Understand the mechanics. Know the on air pitfalls, and you are on your way.
  2. How well do you know the demographic of your listener? You can’t market a product or service to a sketchy view of a listener profile. Redefine this, and start from scratch if necessary. A fresh profile every year is standard to know what sits at the emotional connect of your listener. As they change, so will their needs.
  3. When in a meeting with a potential client, find out what their expectations are from advertising on your station. Work out a realistic action plan and work backwards from that goal so that you are not on the back foot when it comes to assessing quality control and their return on investment.
  4. It is better to have a year full of advertising and revenue that comes from customer retention then from multiple single held accounts. One, it shows that your station has satisfied a customer’s needs, and two, it assists you in managing quality control within your customer relations with ongoing sales accounts.
  5. Product placement is everything. Just because you make a sale in certain spots through the day, make sure they are placed per product to match which listener is listening at what time doing whatever they are doing to optimise the likelihood that they will respond to that product or service that is being marketed.

That’s all for now!

Chris

MXXL Live 91.0 Snap Blog: Effecting change in an exciting new environment

So this week I have been consulting at a station called MXXL Live 91.0 in the capital city of Lesotho, Maseru.

Walking into a station culture and expected to bring about change and development is quite the tall order – and this is my first commercial station client, so things have been, well, exciting.

A few things I want to bring to one’s attention when looking at station culture and how to be an effective change in their environment:

  • Gain their trust. Know what you’re doing, by being passionate about the medium, and where you want it to be.
  • This station, like any other, operates in it’s own mini-verse. Respect that. You are an outsider being welcomed into their family, their way, their world.
  • Remind them why they are there. Being in radio is a coveted role that many are gunning for. These broadcasters need to remind themselves daily why they are the talent that makes their listener’s world go round. They will be motivated to be better everyday knowing that they are the cream of their crop.
  • Revisit the basics. No matter how experienced the jock, they can always forget the basics.,
  • Build an open forum. Let this be a space where communication is re-established between management and staff, as well as staff to staff. Constructive criticism between station members is not only a way to gauge as to whether or not they listen to their own product, but are protective of their own brand.

That’s all for now.

Love and such from Lesotho.

Chris