NCRW Snap Blog Day 1: Marketing Your Radio Station

Sigh. That is one of relief. Day 1 behind us and all is well. Sitting in front of an odd 50 Radio Marketing Managers today we covered a lot of bases.

So what does it take to market your radio station?

Well, we are addressing community stations so I will limit my comments to the context at hand.

  1. A programmatic approach to what is needed to market is key for any media marketing practitioner to do their job properly. So have an ear for radio. Understand the mechanics. Know the on air pitfalls, and you are on your way.
  2. How well do you know the demographic of your listener? You can’t market a product or service to a sketchy view of a listener profile. Redefine this, and start from scratch if necessary. A fresh profile every year is standard to know what sits at the emotional connect of your listener. As they change, so will their needs.
  3. When in a meeting with a potential client, find out what their expectations are from advertising on your station. Work out a realistic action plan and work backwards from that goal so that you are not on the back foot when it comes to assessing quality control and their return on investment.
  4. It is better to have a year full of advertising and revenue that comes from customer retention then from multiple single held accounts. One, it shows that your station has satisfied a customer’s needs, and two, it assists you in managing quality control within your customer relations with ongoing sales accounts.
  5. Product placement is everything. Just because you make a sale in certain spots through the day, make sure they are placed per product to match which listener is listening at what time doing whatever they are doing to optimise the likelihood that they will respond to that product or service that is being marketed.

That’s all for now!

Chris

MXXL Live 91.0 Snap Blog: Effecting change in an exciting new environment

So this week I have been consulting at a station called MXXL Live 91.0 in the capital city of Lesotho, Maseru.

Walking into a station culture and expected to bring about change and development is quite the tall order – and this is my first commercial station client, so things have been, well, exciting.

A few things I want to bring to one’s attention when looking at station culture and how to be an effective change in their environment:

  • Gain their trust. Know what you’re doing, by being passionate about the medium, and where you want it to be.
  • This station, like any other, operates in it’s own mini-verse. Respect that. You are an outsider being welcomed into their family, their way, their world.
  • Remind them why they are there. Being in radio is a coveted role that many are gunning for. These broadcasters need to remind themselves daily why they are the talent that makes their listener’s world go round. They will be motivated to be better everyday knowing that they are the cream of their crop.
  • Revisit the basics. No matter how experienced the jock, they can always forget the basics.,
  • Build an open forum. Let this be a space where communication is re-established between management and staff, as well as staff to staff. Constructive criticism between station members is not only a way to gauge as to whether or not they listen to their own product, but are protective of their own brand.

That’s all for now.

Love and such from Lesotho.

Chris

Top 5 Most Bankable Radio Broadcasters for 2017

5. Roger Goode

Roger makes the cut this year as he had a tough time keeping it together. In what was an imploding industry, where radio in South Africa took many blows – Roger had a stigma to fight as he took over the coveted role of breakfast host on youth station 5FM. “Would he survive?” – is what people would ask. Well, yes. He did. With morning radio that is quirky and enjoyable – Roger needs to be taken more seriously. Underestimated for too long, Goode has great synergy with his team, and makes mornings great.

4. Anele Mdoda

Anele remains a powerhouse. Though this year saw a tough start for her as she took over the breakfast show on 947, Anele remains relevant with her daily show and presence across social media platforms. The only reason why Anele is not at number one is because of the fluctuating change in listenership on 947, where taking over a massive show is bound to drop in numbers until the stabilisation happens (which will happen around June next year). Nevertheless, Anele forges forward without much need from her team to make her a brand worth reckoning. The show has both light and shade, and is finding its feet slowly and surely.

3. Mo Flava

Born 2 July 1984 in Dube Soweto, Mo Flava embarked on a media studies diploma at Boston Media House, majoring in radio broadcasting and programming, as well as journalism. He also has a Diploma in Media Studies. Having hosted radio shows on both YFM and Metro FM, Mo Flava has endeared himself to thousands of listeners across the country and shared several countless emotional moments with them. The great thing about Mo is that he did the unthinkable. He managed to retain an exodus of listeners from YFM to Metro FM when he first made his move. Listeners hardly ever make a move for a broadcaster, as formats rarely offer the same product, no matter how good you are as a broadcaster. His popularity exceeded expectation, and Mo keeps shining as one of the biggest radio stars in the country.

2. David O’Sullivan

Talk is often overshadowed by the media frenzy and popular trends created by music radio. And having David as a talk brand for so long, made for a sense of a new kind of normal to place him in Kaya’s breakfast role this year when Bob Mabena left. David has a strong sense of self and an even stronger sense of listener-self. He connects with you in a way that transcends a need for music or talk radio, and fills a need for being informed and entertained. Kaya made a bold and smart choice putting David where he is.

1. DJ Fresh

The “big dawg” has resurrected himself in 2017. Going from 5FM’s breakfast to Metro FM’s breakfast, Fresh has fallen into a coincidental luck pocket of listenership that has his YFM listeners from 10 years already navigated to Metro FM waiting for his arrival. Being at its most stable through the radio landscape in 2017, Metro has both Fresh and its listeners to thank for its continued rise and strength. Fresh’s show is by far the best breakfast radio you will currently hear in SA, finding his perfect match in where he is right now in his career, and where the industry wants (and needs) him.

A career in radio: Is it just another job?

dream-job-radio

dream-job-radio

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – and this is the final post in the series. See the blog section of the website for the other posts and for insights into similar questions to the one below.

So, Is it just another job?

Yes. And no. Yes. It is a job, but more so, like all jobs, you need to see it as a career.

The moment you don’t have your eye on a 40 year long prize, this is going to be a very difficult path for you to take. It already is difficult enough working in a craft based industry, where your skills are very specific and cannot cross pollinate you to other sectors with as much ease as someone in finance can.

So, don’t make it harder than it needs to be. Here, in South Africa, our radio industry is small, which means that working at a radio station is a coveted position. And there is a very, very long queue of others waiting outside the front doors just waiting to get in. I am not selling you paranoia, just reality. Where what the field of Information Technology does for a growing work force is what radio cannot do realistically for all those hopefuls popping up ‘off the street’ or graduating from varsity.

So, no, it isn’t just like any other job. It is specific. And niche. And beautiful. And wonderful. And so, is quite special. Make the 40-year plan, and aim to become a connoisseur of the medium. A professional that contributes to the industry, instead of just taking up space. As someone else could, and will fill that space up just as easily.

Gain further insights into the radio field

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

Until then, I”ll catch you for the next post series, and have a wonderful festive season.

– Chris

I don’t have a voice for radio, so what can I do?

voice-for-radio

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – this being the second last in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog to see the others and gain some useful tips regarding starting a career in the broadcasting industry in 2018.

I don’t have a voice for radio, so what can I do?

Having a personality is what the ‘radio voice’ is all about these days.

When I started seeing the shift from the traditional radio voice to more personality-based radio, I saw what was a strong focus on the teaching of what personality shift you can make to make your voice better heard. It is part of your skill set to be able to speak clearly, enunciate and pronounce words, thoughts and dialogue with authority and professionalism – so don’t think that having a great personality discounts you from doing what is expected of you. But it is important.

I was mentored by one of our industry’s greats in voice coaching who told me that it was never my voice that was going to be the problem, but the way I controlled it through the confidence and commitment to my ‘radio hat’ that I would put on every day.

This meant finding the right part of my authentically ‘me’ personality that represented a radio professional within myself. It was great advice, and I happily pay it forward to others out there reading this.

Want to know more?

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our final post of the series, I will be discussing a question that pops up with all people hoping to enter into the industry. Check back to the blog early next week to learn more.

Until then, have a wonderful rest of the week.

– Chris

How do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions are being featured in a five post series – this being the third in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, how do I go about getting exposure in the radio industry?

The term “exposure” is relative. If your aim is to be ‘famous’, then you are doing this for the wrong reasons completely.

You are a public servant of sorts. A conduit between the world and your listener. Becoming well-known is an obvious side-effect of being on a public forum, but that, again, should not be your focus or main concern. In another context, “exposure” in the industry is self-made. We have already moved into an era where you must have presence. You must be actively engaging with an obligation to creating content and voicing yours and other’s view and opinions on the world around you.

Through the power of social media, you have no excuse but to make yourself available, and connected. With the power in knowledge of base technology, you have no excuse but to be creating podcasts that are clean and easily edited from a simple void recording. If you can take a selfie, or a record yourself with mates on Facebook live – you should be able to create stories on Instagram by snapping with a creative purpose, and go live with a short video broadcast of you at an event on Facebook live, alternatively posting on YouTube and getting those views onwards and upwards.

Creative directors and industry elite are masters of the world around them. If you want exposure, expose yourself. So that others can see you, and what it is that you can do. Don’t sell yourself short. If people are YouTube-ing squirrels that dance, they can and will watch something cool and interesting you should give them.

Learn more

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in the broadcasting industry, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be looking at overcoming your fears, if you consider yourself to be someone without a radio voice.

Until then, lets make Tuesday a special one!

– Chris

Is it too late to start a career in radio?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions will be featured in a five post series – this being the second in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog over the next few weeks to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, is it too late to start a career in radio?

This depends on what it is that you want to do.

Age is relative to where you want to go and what it is that you want to do. Becoming a broadcaster for the first time at an age over 35 is not unheard of, but is slightly limited and more realistic if you want to join an online or community radio station (this being without any previous experience).

I say this because these two formats allow for members of the community that are representative of a certain target market or can provide and inform as an authority in a niche within the format.

Commercial radio takes many learning curves and justified experienced steps forward to achieve, and should be approached with the same realistic expectations.

Learn more

My book, A Word on Radio, provides more insights into a career in radio, and is available over here or via Amazon Kindle. Feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be tackling the popular topic: How do I go about getting exposure in the industry?

Until then, have a wonderful week.

– Chris

How do I get my career in radio started?

A Word on YOUR Q&A

As of the launch date of this site and my company, Chris Jordan Media, earlier this year, I have received a great number of queries and engagements from people who seek assistance and the correct guidance regarding how to start building a career in radio.

I firstly want to take a moment to say thank you for putting your trust in my knowledge and I am happy to take this journey with you.

As a result of all your messages, I have paraphrased a couple of the most frequently asked questions that have come through, and provided an answer to each that will help others out there reading this.

These questions will be featured in a five post series – this being the first in the series – so keep an eye on my Facebook page or blog over the next few weeks to make sure you don’t miss out on these tips to help you crack into the industry if it is your passion to do so!

So, how do I get my career in radio started?

Before you get started, you should decide what it is that you want to do. I say this because Programme Managers don’t like prospective employees coming in for interviews that don’t have a clear idea about what it is that they can offer the industry.

Identifying your strengths are in line with identifying your passion. If you are passionate about something you are more likely to offer a PM a stronger product or service. How do you figure this out? Well. Let me firstly state that I understand it is difficult to know what you want to do, when you not quite sure yet whether you have the correct point of reference. So, here’s the kicker, start talking to people in the industry.

Visit radio stations in your area to get a better idea as to what it is they do there. Research literature around broadcasting. Perhaps take up a short course in radio to find your learned perspective about what it is that you want to do. Radio has grown and grown in terms of the career opportunities that exist within this field.

Educate yourself. Find out more. Do your thing.

Find out more

To learn more, have a look at my book, A Word on Radio, available here or via Amazon Kindle. Also feel free to contact me for training bookings and consulting sessions over here.

In our next post, I will be tackling the often dreaded question, But is it too late to start a career in radio?

Until then, look after yourself and others.

– Chris

 

 

Monetizing Online Radio: Stop, Collaborate and Digitally Listen

South Africa is still a country that is slowly getting comfortable with the idea of online media. Having worked with a few online stations and seeing the growth in awareness (which unfortunately does not mean the actual growth) of these stations over the past 5 years or so, one thing I’ve noticed is the biggest concern for survival, or even successful inception of IoR (or Internet Only Radio), is of course, funding.

Where traditional models in radio have enjoyed funding from around 70% of what the station makes through ad sales revenue, online stations need to do the same, but in a completely different way.

Let’s remember that the digital space is a world apart from other media platforms. It has its own rules, its own models, its own consumer market, and its own gamechangers. The digital arena has been around for decades, and we – in radio, TV and print – are busy catching up, stepping into territory that isn’t our own to begin with. I think we need to dial it back and stay in our lane, for now. Get both terrestrial radio and online radio where they both need to be, on their own terms, then start to learn from one another about what works and what doesn’t. This incestuous invalidated relationship of borrowing models back and forth isn’t working, not here anyway.

Let’s have quick look abroad at an example of knock-on effects from one platform to the other.

According to the site Electronicbeats.com, in 2008, top radio revenue conglomerate iHeartMedia launched its own online radio network, iHeartRadio, in order to aggregate content from local stations around the country, rather than producing audio specifically for the web. This corporate tide has echoed across media outlets the world over and has forced most local stations to succumb to increasingly uniform advertising, marketing and styling techniques as well as reduced musical diversity. When economics drive programming decisions, it follows that radio play will steer toward the most lucrative demographic through narrow playlists and conservative content.

I like the way this sums up rethinking your own platform/space. Threats are just threats. The moment the radio industry is threatened by the digital space is the moment you lose focus on what makes you go for another century. Operating in IoR (a phrase coined by Hendrik Baird), we are creating audio for the digital space. Content that needs to compete with any other media, traditional radio or not. So, the same applies. IoR is NOT competing with terrestrial or DAB radio. Again, not yet anyway. It needs a stronger pair of legs to start running that race.

Yes, we do have broadcasters. Yes, we do have music. Yes, we must pay the bills through forms of third stream revenue or advertising. Yes, that sounds like radio. But it doesn’t have to be, nor should it. That is if online radio is to survive its first century.

Ultimately, I have a couple of suggestions:

1. Look at what works.
Apple Music has around 17 million subscribers. iHeartRadio has around 100 million registered users. Pandora similarly boasts around 80 million active users. Spotify has raised the bar at 140 million active users. People are online for choice – premeditated choice – and they are willing to pay for it. So, data rates and streaming concerns are not, well, concerns. You must lure the listener to your online station with music. But give them the illusion of choice. Have a rotating playlist determined by some simply programmed online algorithm where users get to pick and choose from loads of songs, and programme accordingly when you are playing music – and according their choice within your format.

2. Make sure you are playing music when you should, and broadcasting when you should.
Have a look at your target market and identify when the peak listening times are. Broadcast then. Have voices on then. Remember, this is audio content for the digital space. While they are choosing to be there, give them something they want to hear from personalities that are the utopian representation of what your station stands for. In other words, no middle ground will work here. You have the privilege of “uncensored” radio here, which means not only can you broadcast content that has no limitations from a controversial perspective, but you can do what you want! Hire who you want. Programme what you want. You have the upper hand over terrestrial radio, so use it. And this is where you can do it. Cult followings begin with alternatives to the norm. Why do what is already being done? A set line-up with gem personalities around ONLY during peak times will draw sponsors and advertisers out. And towards you. Concentrating on making these slots powerful, will give you any good reason to take cash from a brand that wants to reach your growing audience.

For the rest of the programmed schedule, play music! Music they want to hear. See point number 1. As for advertising, why not sell stings and ids that say, “Non-stop music brought to you by <<insert advertiser here>>” or “We know you love choice, so <<insert advertiser here>> has let you choose all the music here”. I’m sure the creatives can come up with something catchier, but you get the idea.

3. Be specific. Very Specific.
The most successful online radio stations proliferate exponentially to a specific need. Do you have yours? If you do. Redefine it again. Then again after that. It will also definitely increase a potential advertisers’ need to identify with your brand and listeners. Concentrate on achieving 100% sales in a much smaller, niche advertiser market. Rather that, than waffling about like a waddling penguin on thin ice in a broader, time-consuming market “guess-timation” that you can’t really bank on a certain angle or benefit of advertising or aligning in some way with your brand.

4. Get a name in.
Not permanently. Just once off. Big celeb names that are relevant to your audience should be sold as fully sponsored features that can be hyped up and bought into three ways from Sunday. Identify them. Rule the relevance of the context in which they will be hosting a speciality segment on your station – and let it sell itself providing you have identified potential advertisers beforehand, approached them on the idea and pitched rates and benefits to why this will be a great payoff for them to invest in.

5. Let the advertiser “control” your content.
You’ve probably had a mini heart attack reading that. Relax. This isn’t a bad thing. If you have looked at and implemented the previous points, you will have room to invite advertisers into your station that have your best interests at heart, even though you should let them know right off the bat that they can control your content through a variably large range of choice. If a clothing store wants to buy a 30-min segment, and you are an alternative rock radio online station, get a guest in to talk about creating your own alternative look for summer. Fill the segment with bumpers and billboards that are customised and unique for the client, and they will keep coming back for more knowing you are the creative genius, and they are enjoying the benefits of having more than a shared partnership in what say goes into what they want on air. This, and all mentioned so far, works, considering one final thought.

6. Stop, Collaborate and Digitally Listen.
This is the digital space. Use it. Sell according to how many followers, fan page likes, subscribers, or active users you have. Focus on the fact, that just like terrestrial radio, these are POTENTIAL buyers to a client’s products or services. So, the payoff is kind of the same, right? Of course, if you are pro-digital and pro-your platform, you should have no problem knowing that digital strategies will work better for you than for any other traditional medium encroaching on your space. Vodcasts, podcasts, banners, global village group think, etc. Use this ownership. Use this knowledge. And make it to the 22nd century. It is called the digital era – your era, after all.

— Chris

For more insights from Chris, be sure to keep an eye on the blog section of this site, as well as picking up a copy of his latest radio eBook on Amazon.

 

Heritage Day: A (very) quick run through of my legendary radio journey hook-ups

So, this is going to be fun. I wanted to share a quick timeline that makes me really feel Heritage Day here in SA. This post stems from where my radio heritage comes from (oh, an origin story, yes) – and who I met on the way, and this is essentially a “big, BIG” thank you to these people for how amazing it’s been so far.

From my earliest (cognisant) memories to the year 2017, here we go.  Thank you:

To Alex Jay who drove me to school every day, where something as simple as your “This Day in History” made me feel as though I was part of a broader knowledge having my own copy of a massive almanac from my Godmother called “On This Day”.  I would read it every day hoping I would be on point with what you were going to mention as big moments.  Perfect listener engagement.

Barney Simon, who put me in my room at nights with the door closed alongside a lot of teenage rebellion. He never came through the door, but your love for rock and a spirit of statement was always a haven for this bullied kid.

Still in school, around my senior years, and working behind a cash register in my parent’s supermarket, Cleone Cassidy and Tich Mataz on 5FM’s days and weekends…trailblazers with the way you communicated new and fresh personalities that were all the reconditioning I needed to pop with personality once I finished my Matric and went out into the world.  You guys, and of course Mark Gillman.  No one forget Mark. The other Mark is coming up, just a sec.

Flash forward to Varsity. Just-Ice in the mornings, Phat Joe in the afternoon, Glen Lewis on Drive and the powerhouse Penny Lebyane on evening talk. Metro FM.  You set the standard for why it was worth taking a chance a changing the frequency on my radio set.

Working at Tuks FM in its newest golden era – alongside so many, many, many legit talented people – Rian van Heerden, Station Manager has of course thanks for bringing me over to the dark side.  Well, that’s where you should start your first radio show – in the middle of the night in a studio that has got your cold lonely echoes of insecurity if you don’t fill it up with a throw down of personality and brilliance.

Mark Pilgrim, who I first followed to his parties at Seventies club in Midrand for “The 80’s Pilgramage”- and then later, as a resident jock, played before his sets, then later worked as colleagues in the same building at 947.

Ah, Primedia Broadcasting.  Passing John Robbie working on his show relentlessly in the early hours of the morning when I would finish my late-night graveyard training.  Simon Parkinson who took a super scared newbie commercial jock, and always had a kind word of encouragement to say before every show.  Jeremy Mansfield and Alex Jay for the many, many conversations both in and out the studio.  News Editors Benita Levin and Katy Katapodis for the round the clock professionalism and ethic that inspired me for a lifetime.   Redi Direko and Leigh Bennie for being the talk counterparts we spent studio side by studio doing talk vs music radio.  And they are just down right amazing people.  The institutions of Jenny Crys-Williams and Barry Ronge, whom look around, know that they are living artifacts of radio history – have a conversation with you and you still are fanboying so much, you can’t help but fanboy even more when you step out and chat to Bob Mabena for another “professional” catch-up.   It’s professional in quotes because it’s hard to not say that inside me there was always a screaming girl throwing metaphorical bras at these greats.

Stacey Norman and Brad ‘O Regan – team members, radio minds, certified friends.

Growing up with constant conversations had with Neil Johnson.  A manager with a difference. Difference is, that he keeps making one in the industry.  And he does so with respect.

Tom London and Tony Blewitt – who sat shoulder to shoulder alongside mine as part of their team with a vision for greater things. Hendrik and Ethan Baird who let me part of such greater things of which visionaries like Tom and Tony, lay the trail tracks down for with their passion and belief.

The team of On Air with Ryan Seacrest and James Cridland who lent their international prowess to my growth and progress.

It’s been real.  A real journey of heritage of all you great people I carry with me into what lies ahead.

Thank you.  For all.

— Chris

Reaching out your helping hand

I have been training all walks of life for around 17 years now, the same amount of time I have been a broadcaster working in the radio industry.  For the better part of 8 years I have been training and developing young talent that are on the rise in the industry, but also been a lecturer in Radio Broadcasting teaching tertiary studies of the craft to students who want to pursue the dream of being involved in one of the most exciting mediums in the world.

If you are in the fortunate position of building someone’s knowledge and passion for being on air, you will realise that it is quite something to have to reboot yourself in many ways to understand the process they are going through to overcome hurdles that all broadcasters must take on in becoming a professional.  It is difficult.  What seems to be commonplace and of a second nature to you after years and years of trusting your gut instinct in making radio magic, is really something you must be able to relay to a blank slate, and realise that you are imparting tools, techniques, mistakes, experiences and, well, talent to this blank slate.

So, you can’t just teach radio.  I did in the beginning.  I taught the mechanics, I taught the formatics, I taught the do’s, then I taught the don’ts – and I don’t think I made very much progress.

I have since learnt from my mistakes.  And as a result, my students have learnt from me. A lot.  First things first, is that they will NOT like you while you are teaching them in the right way.  You will receive praise for what you have done well after the fact, when they are working in the industry, and all the facts, truth and hard realities you applied in your teaching is all they are experiencing – and dealing with successfully.

So, stop the popularity contest. One, you’re not in it for that, and two, you won’t win it anyway.

When teaching a student radio broadcasting, remember to do, and keep in mind, a couple of things:

1. You are their first impression of the industry.  Try keep it honest, but not bitter. Your experiences are not theirs.  Anecdotes are great, because you are raising storytellers. And, we love to talk, you can’t help but talking about yourself.  Just remember, it’s their journey, not yours.

2. You must get them talking.  In any way you can.  Firstly, they need to loosen their lips.  As an exercise (as unorthodox as this may sound – especially, with students that have any kind of accent), I make them memorize and recite the words (and accents!) to Mary Poppins’ “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” (my spell check was on, so that was spelt correctly).  I do this for a couple of reasons.  First, and most importantly, students see this as an unconquerable task.  It is rather daunting.  Get everything correct. It is (after all) the title of a song, you will run into some tongue twisters for sure during your career.  Get the accents correct.  This puts you out your comfort zone.  Keep up.  The pace is fast.  And so are your shows.  There are many moving parts to getting a great show out there.  Keep up.  You can do it. And when you can (get the song right), you feel accomplished.  Small feats that you recognize in your career are accumulated to major leaps and bounds to being a great broadcaster.

3. So, get them talking.  About fruit, or tables, or friends, or music, or whatever.  Let their personalities find some ground in the waffling that will first take place.  But the stronger they become, the stronger what they’re talking about will be.

4. Give them the correct crit.  Listeners are brutally honest.  Managers are brutally honest.  Colleagues are brutally honest.  So, why aren’t you?  They will, again, thank you for it later.  If it’s “shit”, then a rose by any other name, is still a rose.

5. Make them understand that they can be only as good as how much or what they know.  This is not a bad statement.  If you are just starting out, you might only be at about 3% capable of being a professional broadcaster, but you can be 100% of that 3% that you know.  This is really important.  You cannot progress and grow to 50% or 80% if you haven’t respected the work you put in at 3%, 10% or 37%.  Don’t sell yourself short.

These are some start out off-the-top of my head points that really work for me and my students. Be great, in order to build greatness in others.

Chris

For the love of radio

For the love of radio

Welcome back to a new facelift to my blogging, now bannered under “Chris Jordan Media”.  It’s all very exciting.  Independently rising amongst your own ranks is something to behold.

Let me explain if you are new to the site.  For quite some time now, in fact just over 3 years now, I left the commercial space in radio.  A bit of a lost soul, and having been in this situation before (a jock without a home) way back in 2007, I knew better this time.  You see, flashback to the first time I was a wandering broadcaster, to tell you the truth, I swore off doing radio, and tried to go back into what I had academically prepared myself for – which was Information Technology and Software Development.  While I was studying my BSc, I “fell” into radio in my third year at Tuks FM, and was, like most will tell you, bitten by a radio bug you can’t quite understand until you have that fever for wanting to put it beyond and before anything else you want to do in life.

Back to me wanting to quit the mic.  Well, it didn’t last long. Despite all efforts.  I had very good friends who believed in the work I had put out for just over 6 years at that point. They tracked me down, and although I responded literally kicking and screaming, convinced me to join a new and ground breaking mobile venture in radio they were starting.  I must add, that they were the only ones that did believe in my talent (myself excluded).  And that’s all I needed.  A love for radio.  A love for the radio I made.  A love for the radio I wanted to make.

Fast forward to a sense of self-confidence in what it is that one can offer the industry in ways only you can discover, not in ways a manager or a slot in a line up could define.  Where was my love for radio?

As much as I know I am a great broadcaster, a well-rounded professional that knows and can apply myself to various roles in the industry, this is what was important as I navigated through my next (and the next, and next after that) chapter in my career.

Career. That was a word I never understood until I did leave commercial radio just 3 years back. It’s a decision that after a decade of being in the industry – could only process as something I DID indeed want to do, for the rest of my life.  A self-sustaining, service driven, satisfying professional contribution to the industry I loved so much.  So that’s what I did.

I realised my biggest strength ran a thread around training and development. In teaching. In aiding. In building. In expanding and attracting knowledge to this industry.  And I wanted, and did, make peace with that.  I wrote books, taught seminars, lectured classes, started consulting and trained professionals of all walks of life in all platforms within media.  And I loved it.  Correction. I love it.

For the love of radio.  Here I am. With a media company of my own, that I have plans for. As I do for myself, and the industry I love.

— Chris